The long-eared owl may be found in many areas of Britain and Ireland, but it is not common and, being nocturnal, it is rarely seen.

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Introduction

The long-eared owl may be found in many areas of Britain and Ireland, but it is not common and, being nocturnal, it is rarely seen. It prefers conifer woodlands (trees such as pine and spruce), but may also be found in deciduous woodlands (trees such as oak and beech).

If spotted, the owl's long 'ear' tufts make it easy to identify. The 'ears' are not really ears at all, but just tufts of feathers. The actual ears are simply holes, hidden under the feathers at the sides of the head.

Long-eared owls hide away, roosting amongst thickly-branched trees. In the autumn and winter, groups of up to 20 owls may roost together. Sometimes a roosting bird, or an anxious one, sits close to the trunk of a tree and pulls itself into an upright, slender shape; this helps it to blend in with its surroundings.

Read More: Hunting and Feeding

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