People usually think of a garden as an area to grow flowers, fruit and vegetables or perhaps as a pleasant place to sit, play or have a barbecue. Of course, a garden is there to be enjoyed by us, but there is no reason why we cannot share it with wildlife, which may need it as much as we do.

Gardens are Important

Our wild animals and plants have been losing their natural homes over the years, as woodlands, hedgerows, fields, marshes and ponds have been destroyed to make way for roads, houses, factories etc. There are over a million acres of private gardens in Britain, not to mention the acres of land belonging to schools. Any garden, however small, and whether in the countryside or city, can be made into a nature reserve – land where wildlife finds a suitable home. We cannot expect to turn our gardens into homes for endangered animals such as otters and ospreys, but we can help a huge variety of plants and animals – remember that even common species could become rare some time in the future, especially if they have nowhere suitable to live.

Another important reason for having a garden full of wildlife is that it is so convenient – we can study the natural world right outside our back door.

Read More: Garden Habitats

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