The wild cat was once common over most of the British Isles, but it is now only found in Scotland and are under threat with an estimated 400 in the wild.

Overview

Scottish wildcat - provided by Caring for the Scottish Wildcat web site.Distribution: Highlands of Scotland; possibly a few in the Scottish borders and Northumberland. Also Spain, Germany, Poland and parts of southern Europe.

Habitat: in Scotland inhabits remote forests, hill areas and grouse moors.

Description: resembles a domestic tabby but is slightly larger with longer, softer fur and broader head. Black or grey body stripes (a tabby is blotched). Bushy tail with a blunt, black, rounded tip (domestic cats' tails are longer and pointed).

Size: male measures about 90cm from nose to tail-tip; female slightly smaller.

Life-span: about 12 years.

Food: rabbits, hares, small rodents, birds and insects form the main diet; sometimes squirrels and deer fawns are taken.

The wild cat was once common over most of the British Isles, but it is now only found in Scotland and are under threat with an estimated 400 in the wild. Although it looks very much like a domestic tabby cat, it is very fierce and almost impossible to tame, even if brought up from a tiny kitten.

Read More: Wild Cat Habits

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