Global warming is the increase of average world temperatures as a result of what is known as the greenhouse effect. 

Effects

If no action is taken the greenhouse effect could lead to a rise in average global temperatures of between 0.3-0.7 degrees Celcius as early as the year 2035. These rises will be greater towards the poles and less at the tropics. There will also be more warming in winter than summer. In another 100 years such continued increases will make the world hotter than it has been for more than 100,000 years. The rise will also be faster than ever before; a rise of 3 degrees Celcius after the last ice age took thousands of years. The effects are already showing - the ten hottest years since the 1860's have been in the last 15 years.

Storms - Storms, tornadoes and hurricanes will become more frequent and stronger as oceans heat up causing more water to evaporate. Evidence is building up at an alarming rate. Tornadoes have been seen on all continents on earth except Antarctica but the United States has the most tornadoes of any country due to its size, location and geography.  In 2011, in just one week a record-breaking 362 tornadoes devastated southern states of the USA killing up to 350 people.  

Droughts - As temperatures rise, some areas will become dryer and water sources will evaporate or be used up sooner than they are replenished.  With such little rainfall rivers, streams and reservoirs runn dangerously low, yet continues to be used up in our homes and for farming, building and industry.

flickr_christian_revival_networkFloods - Sea levels are already rising at a rate of 1 to 2mm each year due to expansion of the top layer of the oceans as they warm and the melting of the polar ice caps. Continued increasing rises in sea leve will cause increased flooding in coastal areas and river estuaries such as Bangladesh and the Nile Delta. London and many other British coastal cities will be threatened also. It is now a priority to strengthen Britain's sea defences.

 

Read More: What can be Done?

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